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Save gas - Save money - Buy A Tire Gauge and Save Green!

It’s one of the easiest and probably best precautions drivers can take to save gas, money and the environment. Because it is so simple, most people forget or ignore this little green safeguard—checking tire pressure once a month with an accurate tire gauge. Seems easy enough, right? You would think so, with such alarming statistics.



If a sign is posted at your nearby gas station, “$.10 cents OFF Today,” you’re likely to fill-up right away—over the long haul, that can save you a lot of money. What if you could always get $.10 cents off per gallon, though? Honestly, you can. Properly inflated tires will improve your fuel economy by as much as 3.3%, or in money terms, $.10 cents per gallon. We lose about 1 to 3 pounds of pressure in our tires each month, expected with temperature change, wear and tear, and the weight loads of vehicles today. Such dramatic pressure loss is equivalent to .4% fuel economy loss. Over the course of one year, that’s a little less than $100 wasted. It’s worth buying a good tire gauge. But, what does good mean?

If you check the tire pressure once a month at the local filling station, this actually might not be good enough. The tire gauges there are often overused, not maintained or simply not accurate. It’s best to buy your own tire gauge, such as a sliding gauge found at any auto parts store. The problem with these sliding gauges, however, is that they—if not lost in your trunk, purse or glove box—are economically built, meaning they won’t last long or predict pressure accurately. The analog or digital gauges are the best functioning, though the latter is the more expensive. A good digital tire gauge will cost under $50 dollars and will last for quite some time, giving you accurate readings and thus saving you possibly a thousand dollars over the course of a ten year life.

Checking tire pressure isn’t as easy as looking at the tire-wall and looking for the psi (pounds of pressure per square inch). That number is the maximum amount of pressure the tire can hold, not an accurate measurement of what is correct pressure for your car. The best place to look for you car’s psi rating is either on the door or in the manual itself. This number is always read as “cold,” meaning your car’s tire pressure should be inflated to it’s operating psi in cold conditions—before you drive the car for the day, for instance. Over-inflation is just as bad as under-inflation, putting you and everyone else at risk for a blowout. Over 25% of cars on the road today have improperly inflated tires. And 3.3 million gallons of gas are wasted every day. Lift your carbon footprint, save money, drive safely and live green by properly inflating your car’s tires this very day.

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